Rock Scallop
(Crassedoma giganteum)

Rock Scallops may be found from British Colombia to Baja. They are common on rocky exposed outer coasts.
Rock_Scallop_20101020_163851_BCY_2311.jpg

Seen From Its Top
(1 of 3) (1471 views)

Rock Scallop (Crassedoma giganteum)
Monterey Bay Aquarium internal link
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, California
(Photo posted Wednesday 16 November 2011)
(Photo taken 16:38:51 Wednesday 20 October 2010)
© 2011 Bryan Costales
Creative Commons License
#BCY_2311


The Rock Scallop are filter feeders and rely on currents to bring plankton to them. Rock scallops are almost always found out of direct sunlight and normally have a covering of marine growth that makes them nearly indistinguishable in with the surrounding rock.


Rock_Scallop_20101020_163916_BCY_2312.jpg

Two Rock Scallop
(2 of 3) (944 views)

Rock Scallop (Crassedoma giganteum)
Monterey Bay Aquarium internal link
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, California
(Photo posted Wednesday 16 November 2011)
(Photo taken 16:39:16 Wednesday 20 October 2010)
© 2011 Bryan Costales
Creative Commons License
#BCY_2312


All scallops are broadcast spawners. They release eggs and sperm into the water at the same time. In Central California Rock Scallops spawn in April.


Rock_Scallop_20101020_163926_BCY_2313.jpg

Cemented
(3 of 3) (949 views)

Rock Scallop (Crassedoma giganteum)
Monterey Bay Aquarium internal link
886 Cannery Row, Monterey, California
(Photo posted Wednesday 16 November 2011)
(Photo taken 16:39:26 Wednesday 20 October 2010)
© 2011 Bryan Costales
Creative Commons License
#BCY_2313


Once they grow to about an inch or so in diameter, they then flap their way up into a rocky nook and begin to cement one shell to the rock. Permanently affixed, scallops grow very slowly and may take 25 years to reach 5 to 10 inches (12 to 25 cm) in diameter.


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