Garrya Elliptica

Central Trunk
(1 of 8) (4682 views)

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Although it had a central trunk, it was a shrub rather than a tree because of the profusion of branches beginning at ground level.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:40:07 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154007_6379BCX
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Tall Bush
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The trunk ended barely a third of the way up the plant. Yet this shrub could grow to about 15 feet (five meters). The branches growing from the central trunk give this bush a roundish or roughly spherical shape.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:41:15 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154115_6381BCX
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The Leaf
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Coast_Silktassel_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_154125_6384BCX.jpg

The leaf is typically about two to four inches (six to eight centimeters) in length. The leaf is convex with a wavy edge and has underside hairs too small to see without magnification.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:41:25 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154125_6384BCX
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Female Catkins
(4 of 8) (2889 views)

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The male and female of this plant both have catkins which cascade down. Here, the male is longer, up to 12 inches (30 centimeters) and gray/green. The female is typically much shorter and silver/gray.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:41:46 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154146_6386BCX
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Upper Branches
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The upper branches show how full this shrub can grow. It is usually found within the mountains of the Pacific Coast range, such as Montara Mountain, San Bruno Mountain and the coast range in Napa County.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:42:05 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154205_6387BCX
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Silk-tassel
(6 of 8) (2895 views)

Coast_Silktassel_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_154223_6388BCX.jpg

The catkins that form this plant's reproductive parts lend to it the appearance of hanging tassels. Hence the common name silk-tassel.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:42:23 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154223_6388BCX
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Bushy Bush
(7 of 8) (2996 views)

Coast_Silktassel_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_154238_6389BCX.jpg

Garrya elliptica is a native plant, attractive and neat of growing habit, that appeals to landscapers. It is stocked at many commercial plant nurseries.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:42:38 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154238_6389BCX
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Decorated The Trail
(8 of 8) (2953 views)

Coast_Silktassel_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_154504_6391BCX.jpg

This Garrya elliptica grew along side the trail and softened the trail's edge in an attractive manner.


Coast Silk-tassel (Garrya elliptica)   •  Self-Guided Trail #16   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve internal link   •  East Bay Regional Parks   •  Above Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Wednesday 10 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:45:04 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #154504_6391BCX
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