Arctostaphylos Crustacea

Easily Distinguished
(1 of 9) (4100 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_0_153613_6369BCX.jpg

The low, spreading growth and bright green, petioled (stalked) leaves easily distinguish this manzanita.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:36:13 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153613_6369BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Typical Redish Bark
(2 of 9) (2519 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153519_6358BCX.jpg

The thick stems of this shrub are the typical red color of most manzanita.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:19 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153519_6358BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Light Green Lichen
(3 of 9) (2540 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153522_6359BCX.jpg

The typical light green lichen was so plentiful inside this shrub that the bark appeared lost in an ethereal light.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:22 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153522_6359BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Shady Canopy
(4 of 9) (2511 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153534_6361BCX.jpg

The thick canopy for this shrub provided a significant patch of shade.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:34 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153534_6361BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Leafy Stems
(5 of 9) (2502 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153540_6363BCX.jpg

Here you can see the "leafy stems" that distinguish this manzanita.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:40 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153540_6363BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Berries Useful
(6 of 9) (2500 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153545_6365BCX.jpg

Traditional uses of the plant included collecting the berries, drying them, and grinding them up into a coarse meal. Fresh berries and branch tips were also soaked in water to make a refreshing cider.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:45 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153545_6365BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Berries Attract Birds
(7 of 9) (2502 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153550_6366BCX.jpg

The berries also attract birds whose dropping include seeds of other plants. In this way, the roots of the manzanita prepare the soil until one of those other plants can germinate. Thereafter, a plant such as huckleberry will grow to overrun the manzanita and eventually kill and replace it.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:35:45 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153550_6366BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

A Dense Shrub
(8 of 9) (2514 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153629_6371BCX.jpg

This manzanita grows to be a large dome-like shrub about 6 feet (2 meters) tall, and up to about 12 feet (4 meters) across.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:36:29 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153629_6371BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

Decorative
(9 of 9) (2537 views)

Brittleleaf_Manzanita_Huckleberry_Botanic_Regional_Preserve_20100612_153635_6372BCX.jpg

The contorted branches of the manzanita often find use in decorating interiors of houses and building, and to aid in the sale of merchandise. This use is fading as the endangered state of many manzanita is recognized.


Self-Guided Tour #14   •  Brittleleaf Manzanita (Arctostaphylos crustacea)   •  Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve   •  East Bay Regional Parks, Oakland, California   •  (Photo posted Thursday 4 November 2010)   •  (Photo taken 15:36:35 Saturday 12 June 2010)   •  © 2010 Bryan Costales Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License #153635_6372BCX
Add a comment or report a mistake

home contact topic guide top 25 photos video writing blogs upload terms privacy